The association between race and treatment regret among men with recurrent prostate cancer - Abstract

Background: To examine the impact of race on treatment regret among men with recurrent prostate cancer after surgery or radiation.

Methods: The prospective Comprehensive, Observational, Multicenter, Prostate Adenocarcinoma (COMPARE) registry was used to study a cohort of 484 men with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation or brachytherapy. Multivariable logistic regression was used to model the association between race and treatment regret and to determine whether there was an interaction between race and sexual problems after treatment with regards to treatment regret.

Results: Black men (N=78) were significantly more likely to have treatment regret when compared with non-black men (N=406; 21.8% versus 12.6%) on univariable analysis (odds ratio (OR) 1.94; 95% confidence interval 1.05-3.56; P=0.03). On multivariable analysis, black race trended towards but was no longer significantly associated with an increase in treatment regret (adjusted OR (AOR) 1.84 (0.95-3.58); P=0.071). There was an interaction between race and sexual problems after treatment (Pinteraction=0.02) such that among those without sexual problems, black men had more treatment regret than non-black men (26.7% versus 8.4%: AOR 4.68 (1.73-12.63); P=0.002), whereas among those with sexual problems, there was no difference in treatment regret between black and non-black men (18.8% versus 17.3%: AOR 1.04 (0.44-2.46); P=0.93).

Conclusions: Among men with recurrent prostate cancer after surgery or radiation, black men were nearly twice as likely to experience treatment regret. Treating physicians should ensure that patients are fully apprised of the pros and cons of all treatment options to reduce the risk of subsequent regret.

Written by:
Mahal BA, Chen MH, Bennett CL, Kattan MW, Sartor O, Stein K, D'Amico AV, Nguyen PL.   Are you the author?
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA; South Carolina College of Pharmacy, Hollings Cancer Center, Charleston, SC, USA; Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; Department of Medicine and Urology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA; Novartis, East Hanover, NJ, USA; Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Reference: Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 2014 Oct 28. Epub ahead of print.
doi: 10.1038/pcan.2014.42


PubMed Abstract
PMID: 25348256

UroToday.com Prostate Cancer Section

E-Newsletters

Newsletter subscription

Free Daily and Weekly newsletters offered by content of interest

The fields of GU Oncology and Urology are rapidly advancing. Sign up today for articles, videos, conference highlights and abstracts from peer-review publications by disease and condition delivered to your inbox and read on the go.

Subscribe