Associations between patient-provider communication and socio-cultural factors in prostate cancer patients: A cross-sectional evaluation of racial differences - Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between socio-cultural factors and patient-provider communication and related racial differences.

METHODS: Data analysis included 1854 men with prostate cancer from a population-based study. Participants completed an assessment of communication variables, physician trust, perceived racism, religious beliefs, traditional health beliefs, and health literacy. A multi-group structural equation modeling approach was used to address the research aims.

RESULTS: Compared with African Americans, Caucasian Americans had significantly greater mean scores of interpersonal treatment (p< 0.01), prostate cancer communication (p< 0.001), and physician trust (p< 0.001), but lower mean scores of religious beliefs, traditional health beliefs, and perceived racism (all p values < 0.001). For both African and Caucasian Americans, better patient-provider communication was associated with more physician trust, less perceived racism, greater religious beliefs (all p-values < 0.01), and at least high school education (p< 0.05).

CONCLUSION: Socio-cultural factors are associated with patient-provider communication among men with cancer. No evidence supported associations differed by race.

PRACTICE IMPLICATION: To facilitate patient-provider communication during prostate cancer care, providers need to be aware of patient education levels, engage in behaviors that enhance trust, treat patients equally, respect religious beliefs, and reduce the difficulty level of the information.

Written by:
Song L, Weaver MA, Chen RC, Bensen JT, Fontham E, Mohler JL, Mishel M, Godley PA, Sleath B.   Are you the author?
School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA; Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA; School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA; Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA; School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA; Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, School of Public Health, New Orleans, USA; Department of Urology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, USA; School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA; Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA.  

Reference: Patient Educ Couns. 2014 Sep 4. pii: S0738-3991(14)00368-1.
doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2014.08.019


PubMed Abstract
PMID: 25224313

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