Considering racial and ethnic preferences in communication and interactions among the patient, family member, and physician following diagnosis of localized prostate cancer: Study of a US population - Abstract

Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

 

Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American men. The multiple treatment options for localized prostate cancer and potential side effects can complicate the decision-making process. We describe the level of engagement and communication among the patient, family member, and physician (the decision-making "triad") in the decision process prior to treatment. Using the Family and Cancer Therapy Selection (FACTS) study baseline survey data, we note racial/ethnic variations in communication among the triad. Sensitivity to and awareness of decision-making styles of both the patient and their family member (or caregiver) may enable clinicians to positively influence communication exchanges about important clinical decisions.

Written by:
Rim SH, Hall IJ, Fairweather ME, Fedorenko CR, Ekwueme DU, Smith JL, Thompson IM, Keane TE, Penson DF, Moinpour CM, Zeliadt SB, Ramsey SD.   Are you the author?

Reference: Int J Gen Med. 2011;4:481-6.
doi: 10.2147/IJGM.S19609

PubMed Abstract
PMID: 21760749

UroToday.com Prostate Cancer Section

 

 

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