Physical Activity after Diagnosis and Risk of Prostate Cancer Progression: Data from the Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor - Abstract

Departments of Epidemiology and Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

The Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Departments of Urology and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine; and Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California.

 

 

Vigorous activity after diagnosis was recently reported to be inversely associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality. However, men with metastatic disease may decrease their activity due to their disease; thus, a causal interpretation is uncertain. We therefore prospectively examined vigorous activity and brisk walking after diagnosis in relation to risk of prostate cancer progression, an outcome less susceptible to reverse causation, among 1,455 men diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine vigorous activity, nonvigorous activity, walking duration, and walking pace after diagnosis and risk of prostate cancer progression. We observed 117 events (45 biochemical recurrences, 66 secondary treatments, 3 bone metastases, 3 prostate cancer deaths) during 2,750 person-years. Walking accounted for nearly half of all activity. Men who walked briskly for 3 h/wk or more had a 57% lower rate of progression than men who walked at an easy pace for less than 3 h/wk (HR = 0.43; 95% CI: 0.21-0.91; P = 0.03). Walking pace was associated with decreased risk of progression independent of duration (HR brisk vs. easy pace = 0.52; 95% CI: 0.29-0.91; P(trend) = 0.01). Few men engaged in vigorous activity, but there was a suggestive inverse association (HR ≥3 h/wk vs. none = 0.63; 95% CI: 0.32-1.23; P(trend) = 0.17). Walking duration and total nonvigorous activity were not associated with risk of progression independent of pace or vigorous activity, respectively. Brisk walking after diagnosis may inhibit or delay prostate cancer progression among men diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer.

Written by:
Richman EL, Kenfield SA, Stampfer MJ, Paciorek A, Carroll PR, Chan JM.   Are you the author?

Reference: Cancer Res. 2011 Jun 1;71(11):3889-95.
doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-3932

PubMed Abstract
PMID: 21610110

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