Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer: Current Status and Future Challenges.

In accordance with the spectrum theory of metastatic disease, an oligometastatic clinical state has been proposed as an intermediary step along the natural history of cancer with few (typically 1-3) metastatic lesions identifiable on imaging that may be amenable to metastasis-directed therapy. Effective therapy of oligometastatic disease is anticipated to impact cancer evolution by delaying progression and improving patient outcome at a minimal or acceptable cost of toxicity. There has been increasing recognition of oligometastatic disease in prostate cancer with the advent of new-generation imaging agents, most notably the recently approved PET radiotracers based on targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen. Early clinical trials with metastasis-directed therapy of oligometastases have provided evidence for delaying the employment of systematic therapy and improving outcome in selected patients. Despite these encouraging results, much needs to be investigated and learned about the underlying biology of the oligometastatic state along the evolutionary clinical course of prostate cancer, the identification of relevant imaging and nonimaging predictive and prognostic biomarkers, and the development of treatment strategies to optimize short-term and long-term patient outcome. We provide a review of the current status and the lingering challenges of this rapidly evolving clinical space in prostate cancer.

Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine. 2022 Nov [Epub]

Hossein Jadvar, Andre Luis Abreu, Leslie K Ballas, David I Quinn

Department of Radiology, Kenneth J. Norris, Jr., Comprehensive Cancer Center, USC Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California; ., Institute of Urology, Kenneth J. Norris, Jr., Comprehensive Cancer Center, USC Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California., Department of Radiation Oncology, Kenneth J. Norris, Jr., Comprehensive Cancer Center, USC Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California; and., Division of Cancer Medicine, Department of Medicine, Kenneth J. Norris, Jr., Comprehensive Cancer Center, USC Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.

email news signup