Feasibility of accelerated whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging using a deep learning-based noise-reduction technique in patients with prostate cancer.

To assess the possibility of reducing the image acquisition time for diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) by denoising with deep learning-based reconstruction (dDLR).

Seventeen patients with prostate cancer who underwent DWIBS by 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging with a number of excitations of 2 (NEX2) and 8 (NEX8) were prospectively enrolled. The NEX2 image data were processed by dDLR (dDLR-NEX2), and the NEX2, dDLR-NEX2, and NEX8 image data were analyzed. In qualitative analysis, two radiologists rated the perceived coarseness, conspicuity of metastatic lesions (lymph nodes and bone), and overall image quality. The contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs), contrast ratios, and mean apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of metastatic lesions were calculated in a quantitative analysis.

The image acquisition time of NEX2 was 2.8 times shorter than that of NEX8 (3 min 30 s vs 9 min 48 s). The perceived coarseness and overall image quality scores reported by both readers were significantly higher for dDLR-NEX2 than for NEX2 (P = 0.005-0.040). There was no significant difference between dDLR-NEX2 and NEX8 in the qualitative analysis. The CNR of bone metastasis was significantly greater for dDLR-NEX2 than for NEX2 and NEX8 (P = 0.012 for both comparisons). The contrast ratios and mean ADCs were not significantly different among the three image types.

dDLR improved the image quality of DWIBS with NEX2. In the context of lymph node and bone metastasis evaluation with DWIBS in patients with prostate cancer, dDLR-NEX2 has potential to be an alternative to NEX8 and reduce the image acquisition time.

Magnetic resonance imaging. 2022 Jun 27 [Epub ahead of print]

Taku Tajima, Hiroyuki Akai, Haruto Sugawara, Toshihiro Furuta, Koichiro Yasaka, Akira Kunimatsu, Naoki Yoshioka, Masaaki Akahane, Osamu Abe, Kuni Ohtomo, Shigeru Kiryu

Department of Radiology, International University of Health and Welfare Mita Hospital, 1-4-3 Mita, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8329, Japan; Department of Radiology, International University of Health and Welfare Narita Hospital, 852 Hatakeda Narita, Chiba 286-0124, Japan., Department of Radiology, International University of Health and Welfare Narita Hospital, 852 Hatakeda Narita, Chiba 286-0124, Japan; Department of Radiology, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639, Japan., Department of Radiology, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639, Japan., Department of Radiology, International University of Health and Welfare Narita Hospital, 852 Hatakeda Narita, Chiba 286-0124, Japan; Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan., Department of Radiology, International University of Health and Welfare Mita Hospital, 1-4-3 Mita, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8329, Japan., Department of Radiology, International University of Health and Welfare Narita Hospital, 852 Hatakeda Narita, Chiba 286-0124, Japan., Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan., International University of Health and Welfare, 2600-1 kitakanamaru, Otawara, Tochigi 324-8501, Japan., Department of Radiology, International University of Health and Welfare Narita Hospital, 852 Hatakeda Narita, Chiba 286-0124, Japan. Electronic address: .

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