Quality of life in low-income men after surgical castration for metastatic prostate cancer.

To compare health-related quality of life in men who underwent surgical vs. medical castration for metastatic prostate cancer.

We analyzed data from a prospective cohort of men enrolled in a statewide public health program that provides care for prostate cancer among low-income, uninsured men from 2001 to 2020. Outcome measures included the RAND SF-12 and the UCLA Prostate Cancer Index (PCI) at baseline and every 6 months. We used generalized estimating equations to assess the independent impact of surgical vs. medical castration on health-related quality of life.

Among men with metastatic prostate cancer, 27 underwent orchiectomy, and 274 underwent medical castration. Median cohort age at enrollment was 61.3 years (IQR 56-65); 239 (79%) men had less than a high school education. Average follow-up was 8 months (range 0-45) since study enrollment. Seventy percent of patients within the surgical castration group had their orchiectomy prior to study enrollment (median months since orchiectomy at study enrollment was 9 months, IQR 1-43). Similarly, 59% of patients within the medical castration group had begun ADT prior to study enrollment (median months since ADT initiation at study enrollment was 4 months, IQR 1-12). The majority (66%) had metastatic disease at diagnosis. The 2 groups did not differ in age, race/ethnicity, education, monthly income, baseline PSA, Gleason score, or percent metastatic at diagnosis. SF-12 domains did not differ between those who underwent surgical vs. medical castration (on average throughout follow-up, physical component difference -2.0, 95% CI -8.0-3.9 and mental component difference -1.0, 95% CI -5.4-+3.4). Patients treated with orchiectomy reported better urinary function than those who underwent medical castration (+16 point, 95%CI 5.3-26).

Surgical castration did not negatively impact general or disease-specific quality of life. The finding of improved urination after orchiectomy merits further inquiry. This may inform urologists' discussion of surgical vs. medical options for men with castration-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer.

Urologic oncology. 2022 May 14 [Epub ahead of print]

Thomas W Gaither, Lorna Kwan, Jefersson Villatoro, Mark S Litwin

Department of Urology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA. Electronic address: ., Department of Urology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA., Department of Urology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA; Department of Health Policy and Management, Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, CA; School of Nursing, University of California, Los Angeles, CA.

email news signup