Recreational and occupational physical activity in relation to prostate cancer aggressiveness: the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project (PCaP).

To examine associations between recreational and occupational physical activity and prostate cancer aggressiveness in a population-based, case-only, incident prostate cancer study.

Data were analyzed from the cross-sectional North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project of African-American (n = 1,023) and European-American (n = 1,079) men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer (CaP). High-aggressive CaP was defined as Gleason sum ≥ 8, or prostate-specific antigen > 20 ng/ml, or Gleason sum ≥ 7 and clinical stage T3-T4. Metabolic equivalent tasks (MET) were estimated from self-reported recreational physical activity in the year prior to diagnosis assessed retrospectively via a validated questionnaire and from occupational physical activity based on job titles. Associations between physical activity variables and high-aggressive prostate cancer were estimated using logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for multiple confounders.

There was suggestive evidence that walking for 75-150 min/week for exercise is associated with lower odds of high-aggressive prostate cancer compared to no walking (OR = 0.69, 95% CI 0.47-1.01). Physical activity at the current job was associated with 24% lower odds of high-aggressive prostate cancer (highest vs. lowest tertile OR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.56-1.04). However, total MET-h/week of recreational physical activity and accumulation of high-level physical activity at the longest-held job were not associated with high-aggressive prostate cancer. Results did not vary by race.

The odds of high-aggressive prostate cancer were lower among men who walk for exercise and those engaged in occupations with high activity levels.

Cancer causes & control : CCC. 2022 Mar 23 [Epub ahead of print]

Susan E Steck, L Joseph Su, Samuel O Antwi, Bonny B Morris, Brittany Crawford, Swann Arp Adams, James R Hebert, Elizabeth T H Fontham, Jeannette T Bensen, James L Mohler, Lenore Arab

Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. ., Department of Epidemiology, Fay W. Boozman College of Public Health, Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA., Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA., Wake Forest Baptist Medical Comprehensive Cancer Center, Winston-Salem, NC, USA., Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA., School of Public Health, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USA., Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA., Department of Urology, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY, USA., David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

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