Regional trends in average years of potential life lost (AYPLL) secondary to prostate cancer deaths among Caucasians and African Americans treated by surgery or radiation.

To study regional trends in average years of potential life lost (AYPLL) among Caucasians (CA) and African Americans (AA) with prostate cancer (Pca) who received radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy among four different regions in the US as well as across different tumor grades. Years of potential life lost is defined as the difference between a predetermined end-point age and the age at death for a death that occurred prior to that end age, hence the AYPLL is calculated by dividing the total YPLL by the total number of patients died.

The surveillance epidemiology and end results (SEER) database was used to identify Pca patients who were CA or AA and who have received radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy. Study duration was divided into four decades; 1973-1982 (D1), 1983-1992 (D2), 1993-2002 (D3), 2003-2012 (D4). Examined regions were; North East (NE), North central (NC), South and West. Tumor grade was classified into; well/moderately differentiated (WD/MD) and poorly/undifferentiated (PD/UD) groups. Differences in AYPLL among CA and AA in each of these variables were compared.

Overall, compared to CA, AA were diagnosed and died earlier from Pca. AA had higher AYPLL to Pca than CA. In both tumor grade groups, progressive increase in AYPLL among AA compared to CA was noted over the last three decades. In the WD/MD group, except for the South region, the highest recorded difference in AYPLL between AA and CA was in D4. In the PD/UD group, a similar difference in AYPLL between AA and CA was noted in all regions. The difference in AYPLL was higher in the PD/UD group than the WD/MD group.

Racial disparity between AA and CA existed across the examined regions. It is more pronounced in advanced tumor grades. The differences were more significant in the last decade.

International urology and nephrology. 2019 Mar 06 [Epub ahead of print]

Mohamed H Kamel, Milan Bimali, Mahmoud I Khalil, Ehab Eltahawy, LJoseph Su, Nabil K Bissada, Rodney Davis

Department of Urology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR, 72205, USA. ., Department of Biostatistics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA., Department of Urology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR, 72205, USA., Department of Epidemiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA., Department of Urology, Baylor School of Medicine and Michael E. De Bakey VA Medical center, Houston, TX, USA.

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