Influence of androgen deprivation therapy on serum urate levels in patients with prostate cancer: A retrospective observational study.

Although estrogenic modulation of serum urate levels is well-known, the androgenic effect on urate homeostasis remains controversial. We investigated the effect of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) on serum urate levels.

We retrospectively enrolled a total of 489 prostate cancer patients with available serum urate levels at baseline and 3 and 6 months after ADT (n = 150) or prostate surgery (n = 339). We extracted the demographic, clinical, and laboratory data from a data warehouse and compared the changes in urate levels between the two treatment groups and between the different ADT regimens (with versus without luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists) using generalized estimating equation (GEE).

The baseline urate levels and the proportion of hyperuricemic subjects were comparable between the two groups. After 6 months, the urate levels were significantly decreased (by -0.66 mg/dL, 95% confidence interval (CI) [-0.81 to -0.51]) in the ADT group, whereas they did not significantly change in the surgery group in the univariate GEE analysis. The ADT group (4.7% from 18.0% at baseline) had a significantly lower proportion of hyperuricemic patients than surgery group (16.5% from 15.9% at baseline) at 6-month (p < 0.001). Regardless of whether LHRH agonists were used, the serial urate levels were lowered by the ADT. Temporal changes in the urate levels were significantly associated with the treatment group, baseline hyperuricemia, and poor functional or advanced cancer status. The ADT-related serum urate level reduction also remained significant in the multivariate GEE analysis (regression coefficient = -0.43 [-0.67 to -0.19] after 3 months and -0.37 [-0.64 to -0.10] after 6 months). Moreover, propensity-score-matched analyses yielded the same results.

Our results showed that longitudinal serum urate levels were significantly reduced in men receiving ADT. This finding suggests that androgen could have an independent role in urate homeostasis.

PloS one. 2018 Dec 17*** epublish ***

Jun Won Park, Jae Hyun Lee, Hyon Joung Cho, You-Jung Ha, Eun Ha Kang, Kichul Shin, Seok-Soo Byun, Eun Young Lee, Yeong Wook Song, Yun Jong Lee

Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea., Department of Internal Medicine, Armed Forces Capital Hospital, Seongnam, Republic of Korea., Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Republic of Korea., Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea., Departments of Urology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Republic of Korea., Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

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