Elevated phospholipase D activity in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells promotes both survival and metastatic phenotypes

Prostate cells are hormonally driven to grow and divide. Typical treatments for prostate cancer involve blocking activation of the androgen receptor by androgens. Androgen deprivation therapy can lead to the selection of cancer cells that grow and divide independently of androgen receptor activation. Prostate cancer cells that are insensitive to androgens commonly display metastatic phenotypes and reduced long-term survival of patients. In this study we provide evidence that androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells have elevated PLD activity relative to the androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells. PLD activity has been linked with promoting survival in many human cancer cell lines; and consistent with the previous studies, suppression of PLD activity in the prostate cancer cells resulted in apoptotic cell death. Of significance, suppressing the elevated PLD activity in androgen resistant prostate cancer lines also blocked the ability of these cells to migrate and invade Matrigel™. Since survival signals are generally an early event in tumorigenesis, the apparent coupling of survival and metastatic phenotypes implies that metastasis is an earlier event in malignant prostate cancer than generally thought. This finding has implications for screening strategies designed to identify prostate cancers before dissemination.

Cancer letters. 2018 Mar 07 [Epub ahead of print]

Matthew Utter, Sohag Chakraborty, Limor Goren, Lucas Feuser, Yuan-Shan Zhu, David A Foster

Department of Biological Sciences, Hunter College of the City University of New York, New York, NY, 10065, USA; Biochemistry Program, Graduate Center of the City University of New York, New York, NY, 10016, USA., Department of Biological Sciences, Hunter College of the City University of New York, New York, NY, 10065, USA; Biology Program, Graduate Center of the City University of New York, New York, NY, 10016, USA., Department of Biological Sciences, Hunter College of the City University of New York, New York, NY, 10065, USA., Department of Medicine, Weill-Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, 10065, USA., Department of Biological Sciences, Hunter College of the City University of New York, New York, NY, 10065, USA; Biochemistry Program, Graduate Center of the City University of New York, New York, NY, 10016, USA; Biology Program, Graduate Center of the City University of New York, New York, NY, 10016, USA; Department of Pharmacology, Weill-Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, 10021, USA. Electronic address: .