Prevalence and Correlates of Major Depressive Symptoms among Black Men with Prostate Cancer

The objectives of our study were to determine the prevalence of major depressive symptoms and identify factors that are associated with major depressive symptoms among Black men with prostate cancer (PCa).

This study consisted of 415 Black men aged 40-81 years that entered the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry during the years 2007-2008. The primary outcome variable was depressive symptoms (CES-D). Factors included age, income, education, insurance status, treatment received, time between diagnosis and treatment, Gleason score, medical mistrust and experience with racism/discrimination. Logistic regression models were used to assess factors associated with the odds of having major depressive symptoms.

The prevalence of major depressive symptoms (≥16 on CES-D) among our sample of Black men with PCa was approximately 33%. Approximately 15% of the study participants underwent radiation beam treatment. Age was significantly associated with the odds of reporting major depressive symptoms (OR= .95, CI .91-.99) among Black men. In addition, compared with all other forms of treatment, Black men who underwent radiation beam treatment had higher odds (OR=2.38, CI 1.02- 5.51) of reporting major depressive symptoms.

Nearly one-third of Black men with PCa in this study reported major depressive symptoms. Clinicians should pay closer attention to the mental health status of Black men with PCa, especially those who are younger and those who have undergone radiation beam treatment. Cancer survivorship, particularly quality of life, may be enhanced by opportunities for assessment, evaluation and intervention of depressive symptoms among these men disproportionately affected by PCa.

Ethnicity & disease. 2017 Dec 07*** epublish ***

Ballington L Kinlock, Lauren J Parker, Daniel L Howard, Janice V Bowie, Thomas A LaVeist, Roland J Thorpe

Program for Research on Men's Health, Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD., Public Policy Research Institute and Department of Sociology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX., Department of Health Policy and Management, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, DC.

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