Impact of prior androgen receptor-axis-targeted agents on the clinical activity of subsequent docetaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: comparative assessment between abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide

The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of prior treatment with androgen receptor-axis-targeted (ARAT) agents, abiraterone acetate (AA) and enzalutamide (Enz), on the activity of subsequently introduced docetaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). This study included a total of 114 mCRPC patients consisting of 54 and 60 who progressed following treatment with AA and Enz, respectively, prior to the introduction of docetaxel, and compared oncological outcomes with docetaxel between these two groups. There were no significant differences in the major clinicopathological characteristics before treatment with docetaxel between the AA and Enz groups. The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response rates to docetaxel in the AA and Enz groups were 40.7 and 43.3%, respectively, with no significant differences in the rates between these two groups. Following the introduction of docetaxel, the median PSA progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in the 114 patients were 7.2 and 17.5 months, respectively. There was no significant difference in the PSA PFS or OS between the AA and Enz groups. Despite the lack of a significant impact of the type of ARAT agent on PSA PFS or OS by univariate analysis, multivariate analyses identified the following independent prognostic predictors: performance status (PS) for PSA PFS and PS and visceral metastasis for OS. Collectively, these findings suggest that the type of ARAT agent may not have a significant impact on disease control by subsequent docetaxel therapy in mCRPC patients.

Medical oncology (Northwood, London, England). 2017 Nov 21*** epublish ***

Hideaki Miyake, Yuto Matsushita, Keita Tamura, Daisuke Motoyama, Toshiki Ito, Takayuki Sugiyama, Atsushi Otsuka

Department of Urology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-Ku, Hamamatsu, 431-3192, Japan. ., Department of Urology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-Ku, Hamamatsu, 431-3192, Japan.

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