Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Patients with Bone Metastases and Multiple Myeloma

Breast and prostate cancer are amongst the most prevalent malignancies globally and up to 40% of patients will develop metastatic disease, particularly to the skeleton. Multiple myeloma is the most common cancer to affect bone with up to 90% of patients developing bone lesions.

Although several studies demonstrated that endocrine changes such as vitamin D deficiency promote secondary cancer growth in bone, relatively few have reported its prevalence. For this reason, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in patients with bone metastases and multiple myeloma.

Serum 25-OH-D levels of patients with metastatic bone disease were measured on admission. Statistical analyses was performed to evaluate for possible confounders of hypo-vitaminosis D.

We found a widespread and alarming rate of vitamin D deficiency in patients with metastatic bone disease and multiple myeloma. Of note, patients with bone metastases due to breast cancer, prostate cancer and multiple myeloma rarely reached sufficient serum 25-OH-D levels.

It is of utmost clinical importance to assess vitamin D levels in cancer patients, especially in those with, or at high risk of developing metastatic bone disease.

Anticancer research. 2015 Nov [Epub]

Gerrit Steffen Maier, Konstantin Horas, Andreas Alois Kurth, Djordje Lazovic, Jörn Bengt Seeger, Uwe Maus

University Hospital of Orthopaedic Surgery, Pius-Hospital, Carl-von-Ossietzky-University, Oldenburg, Germany, ANZAC Research Institute, University of Sydney at Concord, Sydney, NSW, Australia. , Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Themistocles Gluck Hospital, Ratingen, Germany. , University Hospital of Orthopaedic Surgery, Pius-Hospital, Carl-von-Ossietzky-University, Oldenburg, Germany. , Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen, Germany. , University Hospital of Orthopaedic Surgery, Pius-Hospital, Carl-von-Ossietzky-University, Oldenburg, Germany.

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