Prognostic Role of N-cadherin Expression in Patients With Invasive Bladder Cancer

We assessed the role of N-cadherin as a prognostic biomarker in patients with invasive bladder cancer (BCa) who had undergone radical cystectomy (RC).

The present retrospective single-center study included 433 BCa patients who had undergone RC and bilateral lymph node dissection. Formalin-fixed paraffin tissue microarrays were stained with an anti-N-cadherin monoclonal mouse antibody. N-cadherin expression was considered positive if any immunoreactivity was detected. Multivariable Cox regression models were created to evaluate the prognostic effect of N-cadherin on survival.

N-cadherin expression was observed in 189 patients (43.7%). It was associated with advanced pathologic stage (P = .001) and lymph node metastasis (P < .001). During a median follow-up period of 10.6 years, N-cadherin expression was associated with worse recurrence-free survival, overall survival, and cancer-specific survival (P < .001, P = .001, and P < .001, respectively). On multivariable analysis adjusted for the effects of standard clinicopathologic features, N-cadherin expression retained its association with worse recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 1.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.92; P = .032) but not cancer-specific survival (P = .07) and overall survival (P = .3).

N-cadherin was expressed in approximately 40% of patients with invasive BCa. Its expression was associated with features of biologically and pathologically adverse disease and worse recurrence-free survival. N-cadherin could be a part of a marker panel to help clinical decision-making and therapy for BCa.

Clinical genitourinary cancer. 2017 Aug 15 [Epub ahead of print]

Mohammad Abufaraj, Andrea Haitel, Marco Moschini, Kilian Gust, Beat Foerster, Mehmet Özsoy, David D'Andrea, Pierre I Karakiewicz, Morgan Rouprêt, Alberto Briganti, Shahrokh F Shariat

Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Division of Urology, Department of Special Surgery, Jordan University Hospital, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan., Department of Pathology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria., Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Department of Urology, Urological Research Institute, Vita-Salute University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy., Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria., Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Department of Urology, Kantonsspital Winterthur, Winterthur, Switzerland., Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Karl Landsteiner Institute of Urology and Andrology, Vienna, Austria., Department of Urology, University of Montreal, Montreal, ON, Canada., Department of Urology, Pitié-Salpétrière, Assistance-Publique Hôpitaux de Paris and Faculté de Médecine Pierre et Marie Curie, University Paris VI, Paris, France., Department of Urology, Urological Research Institute, Vita-Salute University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy., Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Karl Landsteiner Institute of Urology and Andrology, Vienna, Austria; Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX; Department of Urology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY. Electronic address: .

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