Impact of the controlling nutritional status (CONUT) score on perioperative morbidity and oncological outcomes in patients with bladder cancer treated with radical cystectomy.

To evaluate the impact of the Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT) score on perioperative morbidity and oncological outcomes of bladder cancer (BC) patients treated with radical cystectomy (RC).

We retrospectively analyzed a multi-institutional cohort of 347 patients treated with RC for clinical-localized BC between 2005 and 2019.

The CONUT-score was defined as an algorithm including serum albumin, total lymphocyte count, and cholesterol. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the ability of the CONUT-score to predict any-grade complications, major complications and 30 days readmission. Multivariable Cox' regression models were performed to evaluate the prognostic effect of the CONUT-score on recurrence-free survival (RFS), overall survival (OS), and cancer-specific survival (CSS).

A cut-off value to discriminate between low and high CONUT-score was determined by calculating the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The area under the curve was 0.72 hence high CONUT-score was defined as ≥3 points. Overall, 112 (32.3%) patients had a high CONUT. At multivariable logistic regression analyses, high CONUT was associated with any-grade complications (OR 3.58, P = 0.001), major complications (OR 2.56, P = 0.003) and 30 days readmission (OR 2.39, P = 0.01). On multivariable Cox' regression analyses, high CONUT remained associated with worse RFS (HR 2.57, P < 0.001), OS (HR 2.37, P < 0.001) and CSS (HR 3.52, P < 0.001).

Poor nutritional status measured by the CONUT-score is independently associated with a poorer postoperative course after RC and is predictive of worse RFS, OS, and CSS. This simple index could serve as a comprehensive personalized risk-stratification tool identifying patients who may benefit from an intensified regimen of supportive cares.

Urologic oncology. 2022 Oct 20 [Epub ahead of print]

Francesco Claps, Maria Carmen Mir, Bas W G van Rhijn, Giorgio Mazzon, Francesco Soria, David D'Andrea, Giancarlo Marra, Matteo Boltri, Fabio Traunero, Matteo Massanova, Giovanni Liguori, Jose L Dominguez-Escrig, Antonio Celia, Paolo Gontero, Shahrokh F Shariat, Carlo Trombetta, Nicola Pavan

Urological Clinic, Department of Medicine, Surgery and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy; Department of Urology, Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Urology, Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia, Spain. Electronic address: ., Department of Urology, Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia, Spain., Department of Urology, Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands., Department of Urology, San Bassiano Hospital, Bassano del Grappa, Italy., Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Division of Urology, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Torino School of Medicine, Turin, Italy., Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria., Division of Urology, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Torino School of Medicine, Turin, Italy., Urological Clinic, Department of Medicine, Surgery and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy., Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical center, Dallas, TX; Department of Urology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY; Department of Urology, Second Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic; Institute for Urology and Reproductive Health, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russia.

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