Non-invasive diagnosis of bladder cancer by detecting telomerase activity in human urine using hybridization chain reaction and dynamic light scattering.

Cystoscopy and histology are the gold standards for detection of bladder cancer. However, these methods are highly subjective, expensive, and invasive. We have developed a non-invasive method for the diagnosis of bladder cancer by detecting telomerase activity in human urine. Telomerase substrate (TS) primer is elongated with repeating sequences of (TTAGGG)n in the presence of telomerase. The elongated primer can trigger hybridization chain reaction between two hairpins H1 and H2, result in the aggregation of AuNPs due to the hybridization between the tail sequence on H1 (or H2) and DNA-AuNPs probe, and accompany with the increase of hydrodynamic diameter of AuNPs, which can be measured with dynamic light scattering (DLS). The biosensor displayed a detection limit of 4 MCF-7 cells (a signal-to-noise ratio of 3) and a dynamic range of 10-1000 cells. Moreover, only urine specimens from bladder cancer patients induced a significant change in the average hydrodynamic diameter, indicating its specificity for the non-invasive diagnosis of bladder cancer.

Analytica chimica acta. 2019 Mar 20 [Epub]

Tingting Li, Li Zou, Ji Zhang, Gongke Li, Liansheng Ling

School of Chemistry, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 510275, PR China., State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, China., School of Chemistry, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 510275, PR China. Electronic address: .

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