Prognostic value of nutritional indices and body composition parameters including sarcopenia in patients treated with radiotherapy for urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

To assess the prognostic importance of sarcopenia in survival in patients with high-risk urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) who were unfit for radical cystectomy or systemic chemotherapy and were, therefore, treated with radiotherapy only.

We evaluated 94 patients treated with transurethral resection of the bladder and radiotherapy for UCB. Sarcopenia, identified from pretreatment computed tomography scans, was defined as a skeletal muscle index of <39 cm2/m2 for women and <55 cm2/m2 for men. Body mass index -adjusted definition of sarcopenia was used to evaluate for sarcopenic obesity. Univariate models were used to assess the association between body composition and nutritional parameters with survival outcomes.

Overall, 68 patients were eligible for the final analysis, and 49 (72%) patients were sarcopenic. After body mass index adjustment of the definition of sarcopenia, its prevalence changed to 53.8% in women and 52.7% in men. Median age was 82 (interquartile range [IQR] 75-86) years, with a median, age-adjusted comorbidity index of 7.5 (IQR 6-10). The median time of follow-up was 12.5 (IQR 5.1-23.5) months. There were 42 (61.7%) patients who died of any cause and 19 (45.2%) who died because of UCB during the study period. Of all the body composition and nutritional parameters investigated, sarcopenic obesity was associated with cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio 5.0, 95% confidence interval 1.4-16.7, P = 0.01) and a low prognostic nutritional index was associated with overall survival (hazard ratio 0.46, 95% confidence interval 0.2-0.9, P = 0.02).

In patients who are too high risk for the standard treatment of UCB, sarcopenia is highly prevalent, but not prognostic of survival. Nevertheless, sarcopenic obesity and the prognostic nutritional index might act as prognostic markers for patients with UCB undergoing radiotherapy.

Urologic oncology. 2018 Dec 18 [Epub ahead of print]

Judith Stangl-Kremser, David D'Andrea, Mihai Vartolomei, Mohammad Abufaraj, Gregor Goldner, Pascal Baltzer, Shahrokh F Shariat, Dietmar Tamandl

Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria., Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Tirgu Mures, Romania., Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Division of Urology, Department of Special Surgery, Jordan University Hospital, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan., Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria., Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria., Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Centre, Dallas, TX; Department of Urology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY; Karl Landsteiner Institute of Urology and Andrology, Vienna, Austria., Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: .

E-Newsletters

Newsletter subscription

Free Daily and Weekly newsletters offered by content of interest

The fields of GU Oncology and Urology are rapidly advancing. Sign up today for articles, videos, conference highlights and abstracts from peer-review publications by disease and condition delivered to your inbox and read on the go.

Subscribe