Assessing trends in urinary diversion after radical cystectomy for bladder cancer in the United States.

We assessed recent trends in both urinary diversion after radical cystectomy for bladder cancer in the United States and patient- and hospital-related characteristics. We also identified variables associated with undergoing continent diversion.

We queried the National Cancer Database and identified 27,170 patients who underwent radical cystectomy with urinary diversion from 2004 to 2013. Patient demographics, socioeconomic variables, and hospital-related factors were compared between incontinent and continent diversion and trended over time. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify variables associated with undergoing continent diversion.

Overall, 23,224 (85.5%) and 3,946 (14.5%) patients underwent incontinent and continent diversion, respectively. Continent diversion declined from 17.2% in 2004 to 2006 to 12.1% in 2010 to 2013 (P < 0.01). When analyzing high-volume facilities, those performing ≥75% minimally invasive radical cystectomy had fewer continent diversions (10.2%) compared to centers with higher rate of open approach (19.7%), P < 0.01. Higher income, facility located in the West, academic programs, high-volume facilities, and patients traveling >60 miles for care were significantly associated with undergoing continent diversion. Rate of continent diversion has declined in most patient- and hospital-related subgroups. Compared to 2004 to 2006, patients in 2010 to 2013 were more likely to be older, have more comorbidities, and be operated on at a high-volume academic facility.

The rate of continent diversion has declined to 12.1% in the United States. Hospital volume and type, patient income, distance traveled for care, and geography are significantly associated with undergoing continent diversion. Even among high-volume and academic centers, the rate of continent diversion is declining.

Urologic oncology. 2018 Nov 25 [Epub ahead of print]

Michael Lin-Brande, Azadeh Nazemi, Shane M Pearce, Eli R Thompson, Akbar N Ashrafi, Hooman Djaladat, Anne Schuckman, Siamak Daneshmand

USC Institute of Urology, Los Angeles, CA; University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA., USC Institute of Urology, Los Angeles, CA; University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA; USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA., USC Institute of Urology, Los Angeles, CA; University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA; USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA. Electronic address: .

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