Hospital Centralization Impacts High-Risk Lung and Bladder Cancer Surgical Patients

We investigated the effects of hospital centralization on the distribution of the individual surgical patient risk in higher versus lower volume hospitals. Lung (n = 28,471) and bladder (n = 8,160) cancer surgical patients were selected from the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database, 1997-2011. Estimated patient risk was consistently lower in the highest compared to the lowest hospital volume-quartiles for lung and bladder cancer mortality, complications, and long length of stay. Although centralization has improved outcomes, lower volume hospitals continue to perform surgery on higher surgical risk patients compared to higher volume hospitals.

Cancer investigation. 2017 Nov 26 [Epub]

Wil Lieberman-Cribbin, Matthew Galsky, Martin Casey, Bian Liu, William Oh, Raja Flores, Emanuela Taioli

a Department of Population Health Science and Policy and Institute for Translational Epidemiology , Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai , New York , New York , USA., b Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, The Tisch Cancer Institute , Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai , New York , New York , USA., c Department of Emergency Medicine , Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai , New York , New York , USA., d Department of Thoracic Surgery , Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai , New York , New York , USA.