The impact of obesity on outcomes and complications after top-down retropubic midurethral sling

Obese women (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2) ) have been considered at higher risk for postoperative complications and failure in efficacy after SUI surgery. We compare the outcomes in this population with non-obese women (BMI < 30 kg/m(2) ) undergoing top-down retropubic polypropylene midurethral sling (RPM).

We retrospectively identified 328 non-obese women and 294 obese women who underwent RPM. Evaluation included SEAPI (stress incontinence, emptying, anatomy, protection, inhibition) assessment and validated QoL questionnaires. Cure was defined as absence of subjective and objective SUI and no additional procedures to correct SUI. Perioperative details were abstracted from the hospital and clinic charts. Groups and outcomes were statistically compared.

All women had a minimum follow up of 12 months. Preoperative demographic variables, SEAPI scores, and QoL indices were similar between BMI groups. SUI cure rates were significantly higher for non-obese women (82.9% vs. 74.5%; P < 0.01). When controlling for concomitant pelvic surgery, cure rates were not statistically different (76.9% vs. 73.7%; P = 0.65). Statistically significant improvement in SEAPI scores and QoL indices was achieved in both groups. Overall, obese women had no increase in complications compared with the non-obese. The chance of passing an initial postoperative voiding trial was statistically higher in the obese group.

Obese women have similar success rates and significant improvement in QoL as non-obese women after RPM. Obesity alone does not appear to be a risk factor for additional complications during sling surgery and obese women may have earlier return to normal voiding after surgery.

Neurourology and urodynamics. 2016 Aug 11 [Epub ahead of print]

Umar Karaman, Kevin J Campbell, Clifton F Frilot, Alex Gomelsky

Department of Urology, Louisiana State University Health-Shreveport, Shreveport, Louisiana., Department of Urology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida., School of Allied Health, Louisiana State University Health-Shreveport, Shreveport, Louisiana., Department of Urology, Louisiana State University Health-Shreveport, Shreveport, Louisiana.

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