Individual risk prediction of urinary incontinence after prostatectomy and impact on treatment choice in patients with localized prostate cancer.

Individualized information about the risk of incontinence after prostatectomy could help patients in shared decision-making.

We compared a historical control cohort (n = 254; between June 2016 and 2017) that received standardized information about the risk of incontinence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) with a prospective patient cohort (n = 254; between June 2017 and May 2018) that received individualized information of the chance of recovery of incontinence within 6 months postoperatively based on the continence prediction tool (CPRED). We measured switch in treatment choice, health-related quality of life (QoL) in both cohorts and the accuracy of the CPRED tool.

Patients in the individualized information group with RARP as initial preference switched more often to another treatment than patients who received standardized information (16% vs. 5%; p = 0.001). Patients in the individualized information group with a high risk of incontinence and with RARP as initial preference switched more often to other treatments than patients in intermediate/low risk of incontinence (35% vs. 9.8%; p = 0.001). Patients with a low risk of incontinence choosing RARP after individualized information were less likely to use more than one diaper a day at any time postoperative (p = 0.001) compared to men with an intermediate/high incontinence risk. Overall QoL was worse in patients with incontinence than patients with continence 6 and 12 months after RARP (respectively; p < 0.0001 and p = 0.007).

Personalized information about the risk of incontinence after RARP makes more patients reconsidering their initial treatment preference. The CPRED correlated strongly with continence outcome after RARP and is a useful tool for shared decision-making.

Neurourology and urodynamics. 2021 May 18 [Epub ahead of print]

Corinne N Tillier, Ruben D Vromans, Annelies H Boekhout, Hans Veerman, Barbara M Wollersheim, Henricus A M van Muilekom, Thierry N Boellaard, Pim J van Leeuwen, Lonneke V van de Poll-Franse, Henk G van der Poel

Department of Urology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands., Department of Communication and Cognition, Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands., Division of Psychosocial Research and Epidemiology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands., Department of Radiology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands., Department of Urology, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

email news signup
SUFU MyBladder app