Correlates of Nocturia and Relationships of Nocturia With Sleep Quality and Glycemic Control in Women With Type 2 Diabetes

To explore correlates of nocturia, compare sleep quality and glycemic control for women with and without nocturia, and examine relationships of nocturia with sleep quality and glycemic control in women with diabetes.

This study was a cross-sectional, correlational study with data collected from 275 women with type 2 diabetes.

Data were collected using a structured questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify correlates. Chi-squared tests were used to identify candidate variables for the first logistic regression model. A one-way analysis of variance was used to compare sleep quality and glycemic control for women with and those without nocturia. Pearson correlations were used to examine the relationships of nocturia with sleep quality and glycemic control.

Of the 275 participants, 124 (45.1%) had experienced nocturia (at least two voids per night). Waist circumference, parity, time since diagnosis of diabetes, sleep quality, and increased daytime urinary frequency were correlated with nocturia after adjusting for age. Compared to women without nocturia, women who had nocturia reported poorer sleep quality. A significant correlation was found between the number of nocturnal episodes and sleep quality.

Nocturia and poor sleep are common among women with diabetes. The multifactorial nature of nocturia supports the delivered management and treatments being targeted to underlying etiologies in order to optimize women's symptom management. Interventions aimed at modifiable correlates may include maintaining a normal body weight and regular physical exercise for maintaining a normal waist circumference, and decreasing caffeine consumption, implementing feasible modifications in sleeping environments and maintaining sleep hygiene to improve sleep quality.

Healthcare professionals should screen for nocturia and poor sleep and offer appropriate nonpharmacological lifestyle management, behavioral interventions, or pharmacotherapy for women with diabetes.

Journal of nursing scholarship : an official publication of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing. 2017 May 23 [Epub ahead of print]

Chun-Jen Chang, Dee Pei, Chien-Chih Wu, Mary H Palmer, Ching-Chieh Su, Shu-Fen Kuo, Yuan-Mei Liao

Attending Physician and Head, Department of Endocrinology, Taipei Municipal Wanfang Hospital, Taipei City, Taiwan., Professor and Chairman, College of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, and Attending Physician, Department of Endocrinology, Cardinal Tien Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan., Attending Physician and Urologist, Department of Urology, Taipei Medical University Hospital and Associate Professor, Department of Urology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei City, Taiwan., Helen W. & Thomas L. Umphlet Distinguished Professor in Aging, School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC., Attending Physician and Head, Department of Endocrinology, Cardinal Tien Hospital, Assistant Professor, College of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, and PhD Candidate, Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Engineering, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan., Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, Taipei City, Taiwan., Associate Professor, Institute of Clinical Nursing, School of Nursing, National Yang-Ming University and School of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, Taipei City, Taiwan.

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