Excessive nocturnal urine production is a major contributing factor to the etiology of nocturia - Abstract

Department of Urology, State University of New York Downstate Medical School, Brooklyn, New York.

 

Nocturnal polyuria is a common but often overlooked cause of nocturia. We investigated the proportion of adults with 2 or greater voids nightly who had nocturnal polyuria in 2 cohorts from the United States and Europe.

Data on nocturnal polyuria were obtained from 3 or 7-day frequency-volume charts completed by patients as part of screening for inclusion in subsequent trials of nocturia therapy. Patients recorded the time and volume of each void. Nocturnal polyuria was defined as nocturnal urine volume greater than 33% of 24-hour volume, including the first morning void.

In the first cohort 1,003 patients were screened, of whom 846 provided evaluable diary data, including 641 (76%) with nocturnal polyuria. Of the total screened population of 1,003 patients 641 (64%) had confirmed nocturnal polyuria. The prevalence of nocturnal polyuria increased with age but was high in all age groups. In the second cohort 1,412 patients were screened, of whom 917 provided evaluable diary data, including 806 (88%) with nocturnal polyuria. Of the total screened population of 1,412 patients 806 (57%) had confirmed nocturnal polyuria. The prevalence of nocturnal polyuria increased with age but was high in all age groups. Of 158 patients receiving benign prostatic hyperplasia and/or overactive bladder medication 141 (89%) had nocturnal polyuria. In each cohort the nocturnal polyuria prevalence was high in all ethnic groups (63% or greater).

In this large study nocturnal polyuria was present in most patients with nocturia regardless of gender, age, ethnicity, country and concomitant benign prostatic hyperplasia/overactive bladder therapy.

Written by:
Weiss JP, van Kerrebroeck PE, Klein BM, Nørgaard JP.   Are you the author?

Reference: J Urol. 2011 Aug 17. Epub ahead of print.
doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2011.05.083

PubMed Abstract
PMID: 21855948

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