Long-term efficacy and tolerability of pentosan polysulphate sodium in the treatment of bladder pain syndrome - Abstract

Urology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS.

 

The primary objective of this study is to report on the long-term efficacy and tolerability of pentosan polysulphate sodium (PPS) in patients with bladder pain syndrome (BPS). The secondary objective is to find the predictors of the long-term outcome.

This is a single institution, retrospective study. The study period was from 1994 to 2008. All patients fulfilled the clinical criteria of BPS, as suggested by European Society for the Study of Interstitial Cystitis. We included only patients with de novo BPS diagnosis and no previous PPS or other treatment. The efficacy of PPS was measured with the global response assessment scale (GRA). Patients were stratified into 2 groups based on the duration of the treatment. Group 1 took the drug for less than 12 months. Group 2 took the drug for more than 12 months.

There were 271 patients eligible for the study. Most of the patients were female (90%), with the mean age at presentation of 45.5 years. The average duration of symptoms was 28.5 months. The mean follow-up was 22 months (range 3-130). Out of all the patients, 147 patients (54.2%) reported over 50% improvement using the GRA. The reported efficacy was higher in Group 2 (60%). Ninety-three patients (34.3%) decided to stop taking the medication for various reasons. The most common reasons to stop the medication were poor outcome (16.6% of patients) and side effects (11.1% of patients). Poor outcome was associated with nocturia, smoking and detrusor overactivity. Good outcome was associated with longer PPS intake (>12 months) and severe cystoscopic findings of glomerulation.

Pentosan polysulphate sodium is an effective oral therapy to control the symptoms of BPS with good long-term efficacy and tolerability.

Written by:
Al-Zahrani AA, Gajewski JB.   Are you the author?

Reference: Can Urol Assoc J. 2011 Apr;5(2):113-8.

PubMed Abstract
PMID: 21470538

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