Bilateral Obstructive Uropathy Caused by Congenital Bladder Diverticulum Presenting as Hypertensive Retinopathy

A congenital bladder diverticulum (CBD) is caused by inherent muscular weakness instead of obstruction of the bladder outlet. The major clinical conditions are recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) and voiding dysfunction. This report describes a 15-year-old male adolescent who developed sudden visual disturbance resulting from hypertensive retinopathy. The cause of hypertension was bilateral obstructive uropathy caused by enlarged paraureteral bladder diverticula. After the non-functioning right kidney and ureter and the bilateral diverticula were removed, the left ureter was reimplanted in the bladder. Pathologic findings showed chronic pyelonephritis and partial loss of the bladder musculature in the diverticular wall. This observation indicates that dilated CBD can cause latent UTI, ureteral obstruction, hydronephrosis, and secondary hypertension.

Journal of Korean medical science. 2018 Feb 19*** epublish ***

San Kim, Sang Hoo Park, Dong Yoon Kim, Seok Joong Yun, Ok Jun Lee, Heon Seok Han

Department of Pediatrics, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju, Korea., Department of Ophthalmology, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju, Korea., Department of Urology, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju, Korea., Department of Pathology, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju, Korea., Department of Pediatrics, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju, Korea. .

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