SUFU 2021: Nurse Prospective on Urinary Incontinence in the Home Hospice Setting

(UroToday.com) This study sought to characterize home hospice (HH) nurses’ perspectives on urinary incontinence (UI) in HH patients. Aspects of the grounded theory method were used for qualitative analysis of interviews between HH nurses and the study investigator. HH nurses were recruited during HH agency team meetings in the boroughs of Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx in New York City.


Nurses (N=32) were mostly female (27/32, 84.4%), between 25 and 68 years old (median: 49 years), and held a bachelor’s degree (21/32, 65.6%). On average, HH nurses treated 18.25 patients per week and estimated that 83.5% of their patients have UI. Three major themes arose from the interviews: 1) Variable definition/identification of UI, 2) The impact of UI on HH patients and their families, and 3) Management of UI in the HH setting. HH nurses lacked clarity on the subtypes of UI. There are no standardized guidelines for the management of UI in the HH setting. Nurses reported that UI was bothersome to HH patients and their caregivers, citing patient discomfort, loss of dignity, and additional labor burden as reasons for this.

There is no question that UI is a prevalent and debilitating condition in HH patients. Formal training on UI subtypes and management is needed to facilitate proper documentation, research, and improve patient outcomes.

Presented by: David Russell, Margaret McDonald, Ritchell Dignam, Kathryn Bowles, Holly Prigerson, Bilal Chughtai, Weill Cornell Medicine, Department of Urology, New York, NY, Appalachian State University, Department of Sociology, Boone, NC, Visiting Nurse Service of New York, Center for Home Care Policy Research, New York, NY, Visiting Nurse Service of New York, Visiting Nurse Service of New York Hospice, New York, NY, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Department of Biobehavioral Health Sciences, Philadelphia, PA, Weill Cornell Medicine, Weill Department of Medicine, New York, NY


Written by: Diane K. Newman, DNP, CRNP, FAAN, BCB-PMD, Nurse Practioner and Co-Director, Penn Center for Continence and Pelvic Health Adjunct Professor of Urology in Surgery during the 2021 Society of Urodynamics, Female Pelvic Medicine & Urogenital Reconstruction (SUFU) Winter Meeting.