Catheter-associated candiduria: Risk factors, medical interventions, and antifungal susceptibility - Abstract

BACKGROUND: Catheter-associated candiduria is a common clinical finding in hospitalized patients, especially in the intensive care unit.

The objective of this study was to obtain demographic and clinical data regarding the prevalence of Candida spp in catheterized in-patients and the medical interventions provided to these patients in a northern Israeli hospital between 2011 and 2013.

METHODS: Isolation and identification of microorganisms were performed on 1,408 urine culture samples 48 hours after catheter insertion. Antifungal Etest susceptibility tests were carried out on every Candida-positive urine sample. Demographic and clinical data were gathered to determine risk factors and medical interventions.

RESULTS: Candiduria was detected in 146 catheterized in-patients out of the 1,408 patients included in this study. C albicans was detected in most cases (69.1%). Fever was observed in 52 (35.61%) patients, and leukocyturia was observed in 48 cases (32.87%). Diabetes mellitus was associated with C albicans candiduria. There were 93 patients (63.69%) who did not receive any medical intervention for their candiduria.

CONCLUSION: Candida is the second leading pathogen causing catheter-associated urinary tract infection or asymptomatic colonization, whereas previous studies showed Candida as the third leading pathogen. Clinical signs and symptoms, such as fever and laboratory tests, cannot distinguish between asymptomatic colonization and infection. Because the management of catheter-associated candiduria is still controversial, additional studies should be carried out.

Written by:
Padawer D, Pastukh N, Nitzan O, Labay K, Aharon I, Brodsky D, Glyatman T, Peretz A.   Are you the author?
Faculty of Medicine in the Galilee, Bar Ilan University, Safed, Israel; Clinical Microbiology Laboratory, Baruch Padeh Medical Center, Poriya, Affiliated with the Faculty of Medicine in the Galilee, Bar Ilan University, Israel; Infectious Diseases Unit, Baruch Padeh Medical Center, Poriya, Affiliated with the Faculty of Medicine in the Galilee, Bar Ilan University, Israel.  

Reference: Am J Infect Control. 2015 Apr 24. pii: S0196-6553(15)00183-2.
doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2015.03.013

 
PubMed Abstract
PMID: 25920705

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