CAUTI

Long-term urinary catheter users self-care practices and problems - Abstract

Aims and Objectives: To characterise a sample of 202 adult community-living long-term indwelling urinary catheter users, to describe self-care practices and catheter problems, and to explore relationships among demographics, catheter practices and problems.

Effect of nonpayment for preventable infections in U.S. hospitals - Abstract

Background: In October 2008, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) discontinued additional payments for certain hospital-acquired conditions that were deemed preventable. The effect of this policy on rates of health care-associated infections is unknown.

The Isolation and the biofilm formation of uropathogens in the patients with catheter associated urinary tract infections (UTIs) - Abstract

Background: Urinary tract infections are the most commonly acquired bacterial infections and they account for an estimated 25-40% of the nosocomial infections. The microbial biofilms pose a public health problem for the persons who require indwelling medical devices, as the microorganisms in the biofilms are difficult to treat with antimicrobial agents.

Evaluation of the treatment of vancomycin-resistant enterococcal urinary tract infections in a large academic medical center - Abstract

Background: Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are a common cause of nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTIs) among hospitalized patients. Clinicians need to differentiate between VRE-associated urinary colonization, asymptomatic bacteriuria, and UTIs to determine the need for treatment and length of therapy.

Postoperative urinary tract infection and short-term outcomes and costs in head and neck cancer surgery - Abstract

Objectives: Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs) have been identified as a preventable "never event" by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. We sought to determine the relationship between UTI and in-hospital mortality, postoperative complications, length of stay, and costs in head and neck cancer (HNCA) surgery.

Promoting and sustaining a hospital-wide, multifaceted hand hygiene program resulted in significant reduction in health care-associated infections - Abstract

Background: Hand hygiene is the single most important intervention to combat infections in any health care setting. However, adherence to hand hygiene practice remains low among health care workers.

Reduction in catheter-associated urinary tract infections by bundling interventions - Abstract

 

Objective: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common type of hospital-acquired infection, and most are associated with indwelling urinary catheters, that is, catheter-associated UTIs (CAUTIs). Our goal was to reduce the CAUTI rate.

Infections acquired by adults who receive extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: Risk factors and outcome - Abstract

Objectives: To analyze infectious complications that occur in patients who receive extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), associated risk factors, and consequences on patient outcome.

Device-associated infection rates in adult and pediatric intensive care units of hospitals in Egypt. International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) findings - Abstract

Purpose: To determine the rate of device-associated healthcare-associated infections (DA-HAIs) at a respiratory intensive care unit (RICU) and in the pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) of member hospitals of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) in Egypt.

Multimodal supervision programme to reduce catheter associated urinary tract infections and its analysis to enable focus on labour and cost effective infection control measures in a tertiary care hospital in India - Abstract

Background: Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI) contribute 30%-40% of all the nosocomial infections and they are associated with substantially increased institutional death rates. A multimodal supervision program which incorporates training of the staff with respect to infection control measures can be effective in reducing the CAUTIs in hospitals.

Types of urethral catheter for reducing symptomatic urinary tract infections in hospitalised adults requiring short-term catheterisation: multicentre randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of antimicrobial- and antiseptic-impregnated urethral

Complete Title: Types of urethral catheter for reducing symptomatic urinary tract infections in hospitalised adults requiring short-term catheterisation: multicentre randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of antimicrobial- and antiseptic-impregnated urethral catheters (the CATHETER trial) - Abstract

Preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infections in the intensive care unit - Abstract

Urinary tract infection remains one of the most common healthcare-associated infections in the intensive care unit and predominantly occurs in patients with indwelling urinary catheters.

Antimicrobial catheters for reduction of symptomatic urinary tract infection in adults requiring short-term catheterisation in hospital: a multicentre randomised controlled trial - Abstract

Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is a major preventable cause of harm for patients in hospital. We aimed to establish whether short-term routine use of antimicrobial catheters reduced risk of CAUTI compared with standard polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) catheterisation.

Common complications in the critically ill patient - Abstract

Critically ill patients in intensive care units are subject to many complications associated with therapy.

Application of a nanotechnology antimicrobial spray to prevent lower urinary tract infection: A multicenter urology trial - Abstract

Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is a common nosocomial device-associated infection.

Device-associated infection rates, device use, length of stay, and mortality in intensive care units of 4 Chinese hospitals: International Nosocomial Control Consortium findings - Abstract

Background: Little data exist on the burden of device-associated health care-associated infection (DA-HAI) in China. This study examined the DA-HAI rate and evaluated its association with device use (DU), length of stay (LOS), and mortality in intensive care units (ICUs) in 4 Chinese hospitals.

Tamm-Horsfall protein facilitates catheter associated urinary tract infection - Abstract

Background: Urinary catheters are associated, commonly with bacteriuria and frequently with urinary tract infection. Tamm-Horsfall Protein (THP) is urine's most abundant protein and is known to bind to uropathogenic bacteria. The role of THP in the pathogenesis of catheter associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is not clear. We examined the role of THP in facilitating bacterial binding to urinary catheters in vivo and in vitro.

Bacteriophages are synergistic with bacterial interference for the prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on urinary catheters - Abstract

Aims: We hypothesized that pretreating urinary catheters with benign Escherichia coli HU2117 plus an antipseudomonal bacteriophage (Phi E2005-A) would prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on catheters - a pivotal event in the pathogenesis of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI).

Device-associated infection rates, device utilization, and antimicrobial resistance in long-term acute care hospitals reporting to the national healthcare safety network, 2010 - Abstract

Objective: To evaluate national data on healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), device utilization, and antimicrobial resistance in long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs). Design and setting.?Comparison of data from LTACHs and from medical and medical-surgical intensive care units (ICUs) in short-stay acute care hospitals reporting to the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) during 2010.

Chief nursing officers' perspectives on Medicare's hospital-acquired conditions non-payment policy: Implications for policy design and implementation - Abstract

Background: Preventable adverse events from hospital care are a common patient safety problem, often resulting in medical complications and additional costs.

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