Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Management of Postoperative Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) After Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP) Repair

Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a common condition for which approximately 200,000 US women annually undergo surgical repair [Am J Obstet Gynecol 188:108-115, 2003]. After surgical correction, persistent or new lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) can be present.

Intra-, peri- and postoperative complications in pelvic organ prolapse surgery in geriatric women

Pelvic organ prolapse is a common problem among geriatric women. Advanced age is associated with a high prevalence of comorbidities that can lead to restrictive use of surgical treatment. With rising life expectancy it is predicted that surgical treatment in these women will be seen more frequently.

Changing Referral Patterns to Urogynecology

The study aims to identify sources of and changes in referral patterns for pelvic floor disorders.

All new patient visits to urogynecology at our institution between January 2010 and December 2015 were identified.

Short-term complications associated with the use of transvaginal mesh in pelvic floor reconstructive surgery: Results from a multi-institutional prospectively maintained dataset

Vaginal reconstructive surgery can be performed with or without mesh. We sought to determine comparative rates of perioperative complications of native tissue versus vaginal mesh repairs for pelvic organ prolapse.

Surgical Outcomes and Safety of Robotic Sacrocolpopexy in Women With Apical Pelvic Organ Prolapse

This study aimed to investigate the surgical outcomes and safety of robotic sacrocolpopexy (RSC) in patients with uterine/vaginal vault prolapse.

Between January 2009 and June 2015, 16 women with apical prolapse underwent RSC.

Trocar-guided trans-vaginal mesh surgery for pelvic organ prolapse: effects on urinary continence and anatomical and functional outcomes. A prospective observational study

Primary objective of this study was to assess the effects of trocar-guided transvaginal mesh surgery (TVM) on cure and prevention rates for incontinence, without concomitant surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI).

Use of Concomitant Stress Incontinence Surgery at Time of Pelvic Organ Prolapse Surgery since Release of the 2011 FDA Health Notification on Serious Complications Associated with Transvaginal Mesh

There is controversy regarding performing concomitant anti-incontinence procedures at the time of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) repair. Data supports improvement in stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with concomitant sling, but increased adverse events.

Primary care providers' attitudes, knowledge, and practice patterns regarding pelvic floor disorders

Understanding barriers to seeking care for pelvic floor disorders is necessary. We sought to assess familiarity with pelvic floor disorders, as well as identify screening and referral patterns among primary care providers.

Treatment of total pelvic organ prolapse using a whole biological patch: A pilot study of 17 patients

A complete and non-splice porcine small-intestine submucosa (SIS) patch was used for total pelvic anatomical repair of organ prolapse.

This study included a total of 17 patients with severe total pelvic organ prolapse, including five patients with combined stress urinary incontinence (SUI).

Two parallel, pragmatic, UK multicentre, randomised controlled trials comparing surgical options for upper compartment (vault or uterine) pelvic organ prolapse (the VUE Study): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

One in three women who have a prolapse operation will go on to have another operation, though not necessarily in the same compartment. Surgery can result in greater impairment of quality of life than the original prolapse itself (such as the development of new-onset urinary incontinence, or prolapse at a different site).