Effect of sexually transmitted infections, lifetime sexual partner count, and recreational drug use on lower urinary tract symptoms in men who have sex with men - Abstract

Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, California.

 

To investigate the relationship of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) to urinary tract infection, prostatitis, sexually transmitted infection, lifetime sexual partner count, and recreational drug use in a population of men who have sex with men. LUTS in men are a source of considerable morbidity, distress, and medical expense.

We conducted a cross-sectional, Internet-based survey of urinary quality-of-life outcomes in men who have sex with men. The main outcome was the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), classified as none/mild (IPSS 0-7), moderate/severe (IPSS 8-35), or severe (IPSS 20-35). The participants were also asked whether they ever sought medical attention for urinary problems.

The survey web site was accessed by 2783 men, of whom 2348 (84.3%) completed the questionnaire. The median age was 39 years (range 18-81). Age, depression, human immunodeficiency virus infection, gonorrhea, syphilis, prostatitis, and prescription drug abuse were all associated with LUTS. Men who sought medical attention for LUTS were more likely to report older age, diabetes, depression, gonorrhea, urinary tract infection history, and prostatitis.

Specific infectious conditions of the urinary tract and depressive symptoms are independent predictors of LUTS in men who have sex with men. Although LUTS are often multifactorial, a common unifying explanation for our finding could be the effects of local and systemic inflammation on the lower urinary tract.

Written by:
Breyer BN, Vittinghoff E, Van Den Eeden SK, Erickson BA, Shindel AW.   Are you the author?

Reference: Urology. 2011 Sep 30. Epub ahead of print.
doi: 10.1016/j.urology.2011.07.1412

PubMed Abstract
PMID: 21962880

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